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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2014, Article ID 276873, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/276873
Research Article

Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

1Microbiology and Immunology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
2Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
3Occupational Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
4Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
5Endemic and Infectious Disease Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt

Received 24 June 2014; Revised 20 September 2014; Accepted 29 September 2014; Published 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Todd R. Callaway

Copyright © 2014 Rania Mohammed Kishk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%).