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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2015, Article ID 697813, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/697813
Research Article

Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Vasyl Stefanyk Precarpathian National University, 57 Shevchenko Street, Ivano-Frankivsk 76018, Ukraine

Received 30 September 2015; Accepted 10 December 2015

Academic Editor: Susana Merino

Copyright © 2015 Ruslana Vasylkovska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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