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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2016, Article ID 3832917, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3832917
Research Article

Penicillin G-Induced Chlamydial Stress Response in a Porcine Strain of Chlamydia pecorum

1Department of Pathobiology, Institute of Veterinary Pathology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 268, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland
2University of Lille-Sciences and Technologies, Cite Scientifique, Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, 59655 Lille, France

Received 2 December 2015; Accepted 26 January 2016

Academic Editor: Todd R. Callaway

Copyright © 2016 Cory Ann Leonard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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