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Letter to the Editor
International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2016, Article ID 8451728, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8451728
Review Article

Bacteria in Cancer Therapy: Renaissance of an Old Concept

1Department of Molecular Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany
2Institute of Immunology, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany

Received 23 September 2015; Revised 3 February 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Todd R. Callaway

Copyright © 2016 Sebastian Felgner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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