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International Journal of Microbiology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2439025, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2439025
Research Article

High Doses of Halotolerant Gut-Indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum Reduce Cultivable Lactobacilli in Newborn Calves without Increasing Its Species Abundance

1Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Digestive Health Research Institute, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
3Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1
4Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1

Correspondence should be addressed to Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios; ude.esac@305rxa

Received 6 February 2017; Accepted 6 April 2017; Published 17 May 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Comi

Copyright © 2017 Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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