Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 318582, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/318582
Research Article

Some New Inclusion and Neighborhood Properties for Certain Multivalent Function Classes Associated with the Convolution Structure

1Department of Mathematics, Sobhasaria Engineering College, NH-11, Gokulpura, Sikar, Rajasthan 332001, India
2University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur 313001, India

Received 13 August 2007; Accepted 7 January 2008

Academic Editor: Brigitte Forster-Heinlein

Copyright © 2008 J. K. Prajapat and R. K. Raina. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We use the familiar convolution structure of analytic functions to introduce two new subclasses of multivalently analytic functions of complex order, and prove several inclusion relationships associated with the -neighborhoods for these subclasses. Some interesting consequences of these results are also pointed out.

1. Introduction and Preliminaries

Let denote the class of functions of the form which are analytic and -valent in the open unit disk If is given by (1.1) and is given by then the Hadamard product (or convolution) of and is defined (as usual) by

We denote by the subclass of consisting of functions of the form which are -valent in

For a fixed function defined by we introduce a new class of functions belonging to the subclass of which consists of functions of the form (1.5), satisfying the following inequality:

We note that there exist several interesting new (or known) subclasses of our function class . For example, if in (1.7), we obtain the class studied very recently by Prajapat et al. [1]. On the other hand, if the coefficients in (1.6) are chosen as follows: and is replaced by in (1.4) and (1.5), then we obtain the class of -valently analytic functions (involving the multiplier transformation operator defined in [2]) which was studied recently by Srivastava et al. [3]. Also, if we set in (1.7) and if the arbitrary sequence in (1.6) is selected as follows: also if is replaced by in (1.4) and (1.5), then we obtain the class of -valently analytic functions (involving the familiar Ruscheweyh derivative operator) investigated by Raina and Srivastava [4]. Further, when in (1.7), then reduces to the class studied recently by Ali et al. [5]. Moreover, when with the parameters being so chosen that the coefficients in (1.6) satisfy the following condition: then the class transforms into a (presumably) new class defined by

The operator involved in (1.14), is the Dziok-Srivastava linear operator (see for details [6]; see also [7, 8]) which contains such well-known operators as the Hohlov linear operator, Saitoh generalized linear operator, Carlson-Shaffer linear operator, Ruscheweyh derivative operator as well as its generalized version, the Bernardi-Libera-Livingston operator, and the Srivastava-Owa fractional derivative operator. One may refer to [7] or [6] for further details and references for these operators. The Dziok-Srivastava linear operator defined in [6] has further been generalized by Dziok and Raina [7] (see also [8, 9]).

Following a recent investigation by Frasin and Darus [10], let then a -neighborhood of the function is defined by It follows from the definition (1.16) that if then We observe that where and denote, respectively, the -neighborhoods of the function defined by Ruscheweyh [11] and Silverman [12].

Finally, for a fixed function let denote the subclass of consisting of functions of the form (1.5) which satisfy the following inequality:

The object of the present paper is to investigate the various properties and characteristics of functions belonging to the above-defined subclasses of -valently analytic functions in . Apart from deriving coefficient inequalities for each of these function classes, we establish several inclusion relationships involving the -neighborhoods of functions belonging to these subclasses.

2. Coefficient Bound Inequalities

We begin by proving a necessary and sufficient condition for the function to be in each of the classes

Theorem 2.1. Let be given by (1.5). Then is in the class if and only if

Proof. Assume that Then, in view of (1.5)–(1.7), we get which yields Putting in (2.4), the denominator expression on the left-hand side of (2.4) remains positive for and also for all . Hence, by letting , through real values, inequality (2.4) leads to the desired assertion (2.2) of Theorem 2.1.
Conversely, by applying the hypothesis (2.2) of Theorem 2.1, and letting we find that Hence, by the maximum modulus principle, we infer that which completes the proof of Theorem 2.1.

Remark 2.2. In the special case when Theorem 2.1 corresponds to a result given recently by Srivastava et al. [3, Theorem 1, page 3]; Theorem 2.1 yields the result given recently by Raina and Srivastava [4, Theorem 1, page 3]; Theorem 2.1 reduces to the result of Orhan and Kamali [13, Lemma 1, page 57]; Theorem 2.1 gives a recently established result due to Ali et al. [5, Theorem 1, page 181].

The following results concerning the class of functions can be proved on similar lines as given above for Theorem 2.1.

Theorem 2.3. Let be given by (1.5). Then is in the class if and only if

Remark 2.4. Making use of the same substitutions as mentioned above in (2.6), Theorem 2.3 yields another known result due to Srivastava et al. [3, Theorem 2, page 4]. Also, using the same substitutions as mentioned above in (2.8), we get the result of Orhan and Kamali [13, Lemma 2, page 58].

3. Inclusion Properties

We now obtain some inclusion relationships for the function classes involving the -neighborhood defined by (1.18).

Theorem 3.1. If and then

Proof. Let . Then, in view of assertion (2.2) of Theorem 2.1, and the given condition we get which implies that Applying the assertion (2.2) of Theorem 2.1 again (in conjunction with (3.5)), we obtain Hence, which by virtue of (1.18) establishes the inclusion relation (3.3) of Theorem 3.1.

In the analogous manner, by applying the assertion (2.10) of Theorem 2.3 instead of the assertion (2.2) of Theorem 2.1 to the functions in the class , we can prove the following inclusion relationship.

Theorem 3.2. If and then

Remark 3.3. Applying the parametric substitutions listed in (2.6), Theorems 3.1 and 3.2 would yield the known results due to Srivastava et al. [3, Theorem 3, page 4; Theorem 4, page 5]. Also, using substitutions (as mentioned above in (2.8)) in Theorems 3.1 and 3.2, we get the results due to Orhan and Kamali [13, Theorem 1, page 58; Theorem 2, page 59].

4. Neighborhood Properties

This concluding section determines the neighborhood properties for each of the classes which are defined as follows.

A function is said to be in the class if there exists a function such that Analogously, a function is said to be in the class if there exists a function such that inequality (4.2) holds true.

Theorem 4.1. If and then

Proof. Suppose that We then find from (1.16) that which readily implies that
Next, since , we have in view of (3.5) that so that provided that is given by (4.3). Thus, by the above definition, where is given by (4.3), which proves Theorem 4.1.

The proof of Theorem 4.2 below is similar to that of Theorem 4.1 above, and its proof details are, therefore, omitted here.

Theorem 4.2. If and then

Remark 4.3. Applying the parametric substitutions listed in (2.6), Theorems 4.1 and 4.2 would yield the corresponding results of Srivastava et al. [3, Theorems 5 and 6, page 6]. Also using substitutions as mentioned above in (2.8), we get the results due to Orhan and Kamali [13, Theorem 3, page 60; Theorem 4, page 61].

References

  1. J. K. Prajapat, R. K. Raina, and H. M. Srivastava, “Inclusion and neighborhood properties for certain classes of multivalently analytic functions associated with the convolution structure,” Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics, vol. 8, no. 1, article 7, p. 8 pages, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  2. S. S. Kumar, H. C. Taneja, and V. Ravichandran, “Classes of multivalent functions defined by Dziok-Srivastava linear operator and multiplier transformation,” Kyungpook Mathematical Journal, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 97–109, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  3. H. M. Srivastava, K. Suchithra, B. A. Stephen, and S. Sivasubramanian, “Inclusion and neighborhood properties of certain subclasses of analytic and multivalent functions of complex order,” Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics, vol. 7, no. 5, article 191, p. 8 pages, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  4. R. K. Raina and H. M. Srivastava, “Inclusion and neighborhood properties of some analytic and multivalent functions,” Journal of Inequalities in Pure and Applied Mathematics, vol. 7, no. 1, article 5, p. 6 pages, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  5. R. M. Ali, K. M. Hussain, V. Ravichandran, and K. G. Subramanian, “A class of multivalent functions with negative coefficients defined by convolution,” Bulletin of the Korean Mathematical Society, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 179–188, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  6. J. Dziok and H. M. Srivastava, “Classes of analytic functions associated with the generalized hypergeometric function,” Applied Mathematics and Computation, vol. 103, no. 1, pp. 1–13, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  7. J. Dziok and R. K. Raina, “Families of analytic functions associated with the Wright generalized hypergeometric function,” Demonstratio Mathematica, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 533–542, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  8. J. Dziok, R. K. Raina, and H. M. Srivastava, “Some classes of analytic functions associated with operators on Hilbert space involving Wright's generalized hypergeometric function,” Proceedings of the Jangjeon Mathematical Society, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 43–55, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  9. R. K. Raina, “Certain subclasses of analytic functions with fixed argument of coefficients involving the Wright's function,” Tamsui Oxford Journal of Mathematical Sciences, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 51–59, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at MathSciNet
  10. B. A. Frasin and M. Darus, “Integral means and neighborhoods for analytic univalent functions with negative coefficients,” Soochow Journal of Mathematics, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 217–223, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  11. S. Ruscheweyh, “Neighborhoods of univalent functions,” Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, vol. 81, no. 4, pp. 521–527, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  12. H. Silverman, “Neighborhoods of classes of analytic functions,” Far East Journal of Mathematical Sciences, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 165–169, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet
  13. H. Orhan and M. Kamali, “Neighborhoods of a class of analytic functions with negative coefficients,” Acta Mathematica. Academiae Paedagogicae Nyíregyháziensis, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 55–61, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Zentralblatt MATH · View at MathSciNet