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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2011, Article ID 527137, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/527137
Review Article

Nephronophthisis: A Genetically Diverse Ciliopathy

1Institute of Human Genetics, International Centre for Life, Newcastle University, Central Parkway, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 3BZ, UK
2Renal Services, Freeman Hospital, The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE7 7DN, UK

Received 14 February 2011; Accepted 28 February 2011

Academic Editor: Franz Schaefer

Copyright © 2011 Roslyn J. Simms et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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