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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2011, Article ID 908407, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/908407
Review Article

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: New Developments in Pathogenesis and Treatment

Service de Néphrologie Pédiatrique, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75015 Paris, France

Received 30 April 2011; Accepted 14 June 2011

Academic Editor: Franz Schaefer

Copyright © 2011 Olivia Boyer and Patrick Niaudet. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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