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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2012, Article ID 381320, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/381320
Review Article

Reactive Oxygen Species Modulation of Na/K-ATPase Regulates Fibrosis and Renal Proximal Tubular Sodium Handling

1Department of Medicine, College of Medicine University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614, USA
2Department of Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
3Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, China

Received 7 October 2011; Accepted 7 November 2011

Academic Editor: Ayse Balat

Copyright © 2012 Jiang Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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