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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2013, Article ID 346067, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/346067
Review Article

Developmental Origins of Chronic Renal Disease: An Integrative Hypothesis

1Department of Neonatology, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France
2Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France
3Aix-Marseille Université, UMR-S 1076 INSERM, Marseille, France

Received 27 March 2013; Revised 17 June 2013; Accepted 3 July 2013

Academic Editor: Anil K. Agarwal

Copyright © 2013 F. Boubred et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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