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International Journal of Nephrology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 512178, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/512178
Research Article

Classification of Five Uremic Solutes according to Their Effects on Renal Tubular Cells

Pharmaceutical Division, Kureha Corporation, 3-26-2 Hyakunin-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8503, Japan

Received 25 June 2014; Revised 19 September 2014; Accepted 6 October 2014; Published 9 November 2014

Academic Editor: Jochen Reiser

Copyright © 2014 Takeo Edamatsu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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