International Journal of Otolaryngology
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Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision52 days
Acceptance to publication39 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-

Aetiopathogenesis of Laryngotracheal Stenosis: A Retrospective Review

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International Journal of Otolaryngology publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery.

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International Journal of Otolaryngology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Coconut Oil as a Novel Approach to Managing Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: A Primary Feasibility Study

Background. Xerostomia is a common complication following radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC), for which there is no single, universally accepted therapy. Coconut oil has been anecdotally suggested to provide relief for this complication. This study sought to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of coconut oil as a therapy for radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods. A feasibility study was performed among 30 patients with xerostomia subsequent to radiation for HNC. Coconut oil samples were provided along with a protocol for use over a 2-week period and the option to continue if they found it beneficial. Patients were also instructed to keep diaries to document their patterns of use. The Xerostomia-related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS) was administered at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Descriptive methods were used to summarize patterns of coconut oil use and paired t-tests were used to assess changes in XeQOLS scores over time. Results. The mean total duration of coconut oil use during the study period was 16 days (1–71). The average number of uses per day was 3 (1–5), with an average amount per use of 5 mL (1.2–8.5). Twelve patients (41.4%) continued coconut oil use beyond the advised period. There was no statistically significant difference in XeQOLS scores pre- and post-treatment. There were no adverse events during the study period. Conclusions. The use of coconut oil as a treatment strategy for xerostomia post-HNC radiation is feasible, inexpensive, and safe. This study demonstrates that there may be a group of HNC patients that benefit from its use.

Research Article

Laryngeal Papillomatosis in Adults: Assessment for Ten Years at the ENT Department of the National University Hospital of Fann (Dakar, Senegal)

Objectives. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of adult laryngeal papillomatosis in Senegal. Patients and Methods. This is a retrospective descriptive study of patients aged above 18 years with laryngeal papillomatosis and followed at the ENT department of the NUH of Fann between 01 January 2009 and 31 December 2018. Results. The mean age at diagnosis was 37.74 years and a sex ratio of 0.93. The 20–29 age group was the most represented (45.2%). The average consultation delay was 8.34 years. All patients had dysphonia at the moment of the diagnostic and in 35.5% of cases, and it was associated with laryngeal dyspnea. Glottis localization was present in all our patients, i.e., 100% of the cases. A tracheotomy was performed in 9.67% of cases. All of our patients have had their papilloma peeled per endoscopic with tweezers. No cases of malignant degeneration were found in our study. Conclusion. Laryngeal papillomatosis is the most common benign tumor of the larynx in both children and adults. Despite the progress of endoscopy and antiviral treatments, its treatment poses many problems in our undermedicalized countries.

Research Article

Understanding the Lingual Frenulum: Histological Structure, Tissue Composition, and Implications for Tongue Tie Surgery

Lingual frenotomy has become an increasingly common surgical procedure, performed for a broad range of indications from birth through adulthood. This study utilizes histology to define the structure and tissue composition of the lingual frenulum and floor of mouth (FOM) fascia. En bloc specimens of anterior tongue, lingual frenulum, and FOM tissues were harvested from ten embalmed adult cadavers. An additional three fresh tissue cadaveric specimens were frozen with the tongue supported in an elevated position, to enable harvesting and paraffin embedding of the elevated lingual frenulum as a discrete specimen. All 13 specimens were prepared as ten-micron coronal sections using stains to determine the general morphology of the lingual frenulum, its relationship to neighbouring structures (Mason’s Trichrome), presence of elastin fibers (Verhoeff-van Gieson), and collagen typing (Picrosirius Red). Our results have shown a submucosal layer of fascia spanning horizontally across the FOM was present in all specimens, with variability in fascial thickness and histologic composition. This FOM fascia suspends the sublingual glands, vessels, and genioglossus from its deep surface. The elevated lingual frenulum is formed by a central fold of this FOM fascia together with the overlying oral mucosa with variability in fascial thickness and composition. With tongue elevation, the fascia mobilizes to a variable extent into the fold forming the frenulum, providing a structural explanation for the individual variability in lingual frenulum morphology seen in clinical practice.

Research Article

Health-Related Quality of Life and Sleep Quality after 12 Months of Treatment in Nonsevere Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Clinical Trial with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Mandibular Advancement Splints

In this randomized controlled trial, patients with nonsevere obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or a twin block mandibular advancement splint (MAS). The primary objective was to compare how CPAP and MAS treatments change the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and self-reported sleep quality of patients after 12 months of treatment. In total, 104 patients were recruited: 55 were allocated to the CPAP treatment group and 49 to the MAS treatment group. We used the SF36 questionnaire to evaluate HRQoL and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to evaluate sleep quality. All patients were included in the intention-to-treat analyses. These analyses showed improvements in the SF36 physical component score (from 48.8 ± 7.6 at baseline to 50.5 ± 8.0 at follow-up, ) in the CPAP treatment group and in the mental component score (from 44.9 ± 12.1 to 49.3 ± 9.2, ) in the MAS treatment group. The PSQI global score improved in both the CPAP (from 7.7 ± 3.5 to 6.6 ± 2.9, ) and the MAS (8.0 ± 3.1 to 6.1 ± 2.6, ) treatment groups. No difference was found between the treatment groups in any of the SF36 scores or PSQI global score at the final follow-up () in any analysis. The improvement in the SF36 vitality domain moderately correlated to the improvement in the PSQI global score in both groups (CPAP: , ; MAS: , ). In the MAS treatment group, we also found a weak correlation between improvements in the SF36 mental component score and PSQI global score (, ). In conclusion, CPAP and MAS treatments lead to similar improvements in the HRQoL and self-reported sleep quality in nonsevere OSA. Improvements in aspects of HRQoL seem to be moderately correlated to the self-reported sleep quality in both CPAP and MAS treatments.

Research Article

Laser-Assisted Endoscopic Cricotracheal Stenosis Resection (CTSR) in Paediatric Congenital Cartilaginous Subglottic Stenosis

Subglottic stenosis (SGS) in children can be a congenital condition or acquired through injury such as from prolonged intubation. Surgeons face challenges in choosing the best SGS treatment for a particular patient because of variability in the success rate of each technique. Conventional open surgical resection and reconstruction have been proven effective but, in recent years, endoscopic surgery has become more prevalent as it eliminates the incision and reduces the surgery time and subsequent hospital stay. The purpose of this retrospective case study was to report on an endoscopic technique using a CO2 laser for cricotracheal stenosis resection (CTSR) for high-grade congenital SGS. From forty-five paediatric patients who underwent endoscopic intervention as a primary modality of treatment for high-grade SGS in a tertiary referral centre, a total of eight patients who met the inclusion criteria have been included in our study. This small patient series is the first to use a CO2 laser alone as a single excision tool to eliminate complex congenital SGS and restore airway patency. The procedure’s goal was to return the airway to an early stage of postintubation injury prior to scar formation; therefore, surgical sessions at intervals of 2–3 weeks were performed to ensure natural epithelization, to remove any granulation tissue, and manage fibrosis. Successful treatment was defined as a resolution of symptoms, restoration of a normal patent airway with no stenosis, and decannulation. The success rate was 75%. Two outcomes need to be highlighted. First, the CO2 laser should be reconsidered as an excision tool for congenital SGS because of its low risk of exacerbating preexisting stenosis. It allows the surgeon to restore and augment the airway without the need for open surgery or dilatation. Second, the shorter interval between procedures is crucial for controlling the healing process and making sure that it is proceeding properly.

Research Article

Comparison of Postoperative Pain and Appetite in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Monopolar Tonsillotomy and Cold Steel Tonsillectomy

Objectives. Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is amongst the most widely performed pediatric surgeries in the United States (US) and the whole world. AT includes two major surgical techniques: total tonsillectomy (TT) and partial tonsillectomy (PT). Several studies have been conducted to evaluate the difference between TT and PT and assess the comparative effectiveness, benefits, and sequelae between both. In Lebanon, very few studies were done tackling this issue and assessing its sequelae on the pediatric population. Methods. A prospective study was conducted including pediatric patients aged between 2 and 9 years, who were admitted for partial tonsillectomy (PT) or total tonsillectomy (TT) in 2018. An estimated number of children included were 50: 25 patients underwent PT and 25 patients underwent TT. Patients were sent home on day 1 post-op with a questionnaire that evaluates the following over the first 10 days post-op: pain using the Wong–Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale and the “Parents Postoperative Pain Measure” (PPPM) questionnaire, and appetite using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results. Patients in the PT group and in the TT group had no demographical differences in terms of age, BMI, exposure to smoking, area of living, and attending a day care center. Comparison between PT and TT revealed a significant difference in both pain and appetite scales. Patients who underwent PT had significantly lower PPPM scores on the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 10th day after surgery compared to the TT patients. Further validation was revealed by the Wong–Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale, showing that the PT surgery group experienced significantly less postoperative pain compared to the TT surgery group. Assessing the appetite using the visual analogue scale favored PT over TT. Comparisons revealed that most PT patients returned to their normal eating habits starting at day 4 while this was applicable in the TT group at day 10. Postoperative pain improved from day 1 to day 10 in both surgical groups. Conclusion. In conclusion, the recovery process after the PT surgery causes less postoperative morbidity, thus an earlier return to normal activity compared to the TT. The patients of the latter group are affected by more pain and less appetite over the first 10 days after the surgery.

International Journal of Otolaryngology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision52 days
Acceptance to publication39 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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