International Journal of Pediatrics
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Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision122 days
Acceptance to publication21 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.710
Impact Factor2.1

Anemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: A Finding from Low-Resource Setting Hospitals

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 Journal profile

International Journal of Pediatrics provides a forum for pediatricians who diagnose and treat disorders in infants, children, and adolescents. Studies relate to pediatric subspecialities including adolescent medicine, cardiology, critical care etc.

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Chief Editor, Dr Alessandro Mussa, is based in the Department of Public Health and Pediatrics at the University of Torino, Italy.

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Research Article

Prevalence and Factors Associated with Iron Deficiency Anaemia among Children Aged 6-23 Months in Southwestern Uganda

Iron deficiency anaemia is still a global public health concern with the highest burden among children 6 to 23 months due to their rapid growth spurt exceeding breastmilk supply. Therefore, nutritional supply is a key source of iron to attain the required nutrients for better growth and development. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study done at Ishaka Adventist Hospital (IAH) and Kampala International University Teaching Hospital (KIUTH) from April to July 2022. Participants were consecutively enrolled in the study. Structured questionnaires, 24-hour dietary recall, and clinical assessment were used to obtain data. Data analysis was done using the statistical package for social scientists (SPSS) V22.0. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were done using logistic regression for associations with significance set at value < 0.05. A total of 364 participants were enrolled, with the majority being males (198, 54.4%) and born at term (333, 91.5%). The modal age was 12-17 months [163(44.8%)] with a mean age of 14.1 months (SD 5.32). The overall prevalence of IDA was 151/364 (41.5%). The factors associated with IDA included male sex (aOR 1.61), current episode of diarrhoea (aOR 1.71), poor meal frequency (aOR 1.78), no vegetable consumption (aOR 2.47), and consuming fruits once (aOR 1.97) in 7 days preceding the study. The study finds a high prevalence of IDA among infants 6-23 months with at least four in 10 being affected. Screening for IDA should be recommended in male children with current diarrhoea, poor intake of fruits and vegetables, and poor meal frequency. The Mentzer index is an equally good alternative screening test for IDA.

Research Article

Genetic Information to Share with Parents when Newborn Screening Reveals the Presence of Sickle Cell Trait

The primary purpose of newborn screening for sickle cell disease is to diagnose the disease before the appearance of symptoms and to initiate early treatment. To answer the question “What genetic information needs to be communicated to parents when newborn screening reveals the presence of a sickle cell trait,” we conducted a survey using a self-administered online questionnaire. We received responses from 122 healthcare workers and members of sickle cell disease associations, in France and French overseas departments. Our results showed similar positions on this issue. The information conveyed is not consistent and is the result of grassroots initiatives. The negative consequences generated by this information could be reduced when this information is delivered by a multidisciplinary team, within the framework of a dedicated consultation. This information on sickle cell trait status should be given in at least three key periods: the neonatal period, early adolescence, and later adolescence, when reproductive implications become important. Neonatal screening programs should develop systems that allow referring physicians to easily access the results of neonatal screening electronically. Harmonization of practices should allow a better analysis of the consequences of this counselling on family projects.

Research Article

Peer Learning Has Double Effects in Clinical Research Education: A Qualitative Study

Background. Peer learning has been recognized for its effectiveness in health professional education. However, its effects on clinical research education are not clear and were explored qualitatively in this study. Methods. The peer-learning method was implemented in a clinical research education seminar for early-career physicians at a children’s and mothers’ hospital in 2019. We conducted semistructured interviews with participants about peer-learning experience and qualitatively analyzed verbatim transcripts using Engeström’s “activity theory” framework. Results. From framework analysis, learning processes were extracted mainly in four domains, namely, (a) instrument and its usage: research design and its match with research question, (b) outcome: research result, (c) community: seminar, and (d) division of labor: roles of participants and staff. Conclusions. In this report of a peer-learning trial in postgraduate clinical research education, the following two pathways of peer-learning effects were abstracted. The indirect pathway was the presentations by experienced participants providing concrete examples of research processes. The direct pathway was the questions from experienced participants to beginners about specific and concrete questions. There were also two points to consider in peer learning in clinical research education: gaps in premise knowledge and beginners’ frustration about expected outcomes. We believe that these extracted pathways and points imply the significance and considerations for continuing the peer-learning trial in clinical research education. Future tasks are to promote clinical research education with a view to the learning effects, not only on individuals, but also on groups.

Research Article

Feasibility of Spectral Analysis as a Tool in Nursing Research to Quantify Patterns of Respiration in Premature Infants

Background. Respiratory difficulties are a common concern in preterm infants, and they can lead to long-term health problems. Few studies have investigated the use of spectral analysis as a biomarker to quantify respiration patterns in preterm infants. Objective. To evaluate the feasibility of using spectral analysis of heart rate variability as a biomarker for the quantification of respiratory patterns in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants compared to direct observation. Methods. In a comparative, small-scale feasibility study, 18 preterm infants born during their 27th to 28th gestational week (weighing <1500 grams) participated by convenience. Respiratory patterns (regular or irregular; shallow or deep) were directly observed on the 28th week during playback of speech recording. Heart rate variability was simultaneously measured using spectral analysis of heart periods, from which the mean values influenced by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (frequencies of 0.30–1.0 Hz) were compared to each observed respiratory pattern. The magnitudes of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and the area under the curve were determined. Results. The magnitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (frequencies of 0.30–1.0 Hz) in infants observed to be displaying irregular shallow respiration was greater than that in infants with regular deep respiration. Further, there was a shift from lower frequencies () to higher frequencies (). Conclusion. In contrast with direct observation, spectral analysis allowed for the quantification of respiratory patterns in a vulnerable population of preterm infants of interest to the nursing scientific and practice community. Future directions include applying this biomarker to evaluate both developmental and pathological trends in the respiratory patterns of preterm infants.

Research Article

Newborn Pulse Oximetry Screening for Detecting Congenital Heart Disease: Experience at a Tertiary Care Center

Background. Congenital heart disease (CHD) remains the number one birth defect worldwide. Pulse oximetry screening (POS) is a widely used CHD screening modality effective in detecting critical lesions. This study is aimed at assessing the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of POS in a cohort of term well-babies admitted to a regular nursery in a tertiary care center. Methods. We reviewed the charts of term babies admitted to our regular nursery over a period of one year. The results of POS and the findings of echocardiography were collected. Similarly, we explored the records of our fetal echocardiography program to identify the fetuses screened for CHD during the same period. Results. 900 term babies were born and admitted to newborn nursery at our center, and 69 fetuses were evaluated by our fetal cardiology team during the study period. None of our term babies had a positive POS at birth or 24 hours of age. However, 56 babies had a cardiac echo before hospital discharge due to suspicious findings on physical examination or a family history of CHD. A simple noncritical CHD was noted in 10 of them. Additionally, 53 babies underwent echocardiography within the first five years of life; a simple CHD was noted in 6 of them. In parallel, 21 of our fetuses were found to have CHD: 16 simple CHD and 5 critical CHD (CCHD). Conclusion. Despite its cost-effectiveness and efficacy in screening for CCHD, POS is suboptimal for detecting simple CHD. In the absence of a proper prenatal screening and fetal echocardiography program, POS remains a cost-effective modality for detecting CCHD.

Review Article

Palliative Extubation in Pediatric Patients in the Intensive Care Unit and at Home: A Scoping Review

Aim. This scoping review is aimed at systematically mapping the evidence on palliative extubation in the pediatric intensive care unit. Methods. MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Cochrane databases were searched for articles published between January 2018 and December 2022, in English. Critical appraisal of sources of evidence was done using the Joanna Briggs Institute tools. PRISMA guidelines for scoping reviews were followed. Results. Six studies were included, with 366 patients, from the USA (), Brazil (), and Germany (). Three were high-quality studies, two were moderate, and one was a low-quality study. Most studies were retrospective analysis; two were narrative approaches; two were evidence-based recommendation and quality improvement project; one study was a prospective intervention. Conclusion. Symptom control is crucial pre- and postextubation. A checklist (symptom management and family support) and a postdebriefing template improve team communication and staff support postextubation. Critical care transports from the hospital are feasible to provide extubation at home. A framework addressing common planning challenges and resource management is recommended for extubation at home. The provision of pediatric palliative extubation is necessary since futile measures and prolongation of suffering violate the principle of nonmaleficence. Future research on this subject will result in more benefits for patients, parents, and professionals.

International Journal of Pediatrics
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision122 days
Acceptance to publication21 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.710
Impact Factor2.1
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