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International Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 189142, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/189142
Review Article

Sedation and Analgesia in Children with Developmental Disabilities and Neurologic Disorders

1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University College of Medicine, 2900 Queen Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19129, USA

Received 2 December 2009; Revised 15 June 2010; Accepted 20 June 2010

Academic Editor: Savithiri Ratnapalan

Copyright © 2010 Todd J. Kilbaugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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