International Journal of Pediatrics

The Development of Oral Feeding Skills in Infants


Publishing date
29 Jun 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
10 Feb 2012

Lead Editor

1Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza BCM 320, Houston, TX 77030, USA

2School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences (M310), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

3Department of Pediatrics, Showa University of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

4Centre des Sciences du Goût (Centre for Olfaction and Taste Science) CNRS (UMR 6265), Université de Bourgogne, France


The Development of Oral Feeding Skills in Infants

Description

Appropriate nutritional intake is a major component of growth for all infants. Interests in nutrition customarily have been centered on the types of nutrients and caloric intake offered, e.g., the benefits of mother's milk over that of formula, presence/absence of growth factors, and more recently the potential advantages provided by probiotics early in life. An important aspect of infant nutrition that has been overlooked until recently is the ability of infants to take their nutrients by mouth safely, effectively, and successfully. The majority of healthy term newborns are often fed satisfactorily from the breast or bottle in hospital. As such, feeding difficulties typically are only identified after discharge. Recently, there has been more recognition that infant-related anomalies may impact successful feeding, yet basic knowledge regarding the physiology of feeding is still lacking. In the past two decades, health professionals along with the general population have also come to realize that a great number of infants born prematurely cannot readily feed by mouth, putting themselves at risk of adverse events that can range from oxygen desaturation to aspiration pneumonia. Long-term oral feeding difficulties resulting from such early incompetence have also been identified through the increased feeding disorders clinics that follow these infants.

No medical events solely impact on any patient, but this is even more so in the case of infants who are helpless and must rely on caregivers, principally their mother, for survival. Consequently, an infant's growth and development becomes a function, not only on their own maturing attributes and surroundings, but also, very importantly, on the quality of interactions between mother and infant during difficult times. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • What adequate infant oral feeding skills entail, be it breast or bottle feeding
  • The maternal and external environmental factors that may affect the development of these skills
  • The consequences that infant oral feeding difficulties may engender within their immediate milieu

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijped/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:

Manuscript DueFriday, 10 February, 2012
First Round of ReviewsFriday, 4 May, 2012
Publication DateFriday, 29 June, 2012

Lead Guest Editor

  • Chantal Lau, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza BCM 320, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Guest Editors

  • Katsumi Mizuno, Department of Pediatrics, Showa University of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Donna Geddes, School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences (M310), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
  • Benoist Schaal, Centre des Sciences du Goût (Centre for Olfaction and Taste Science) CNRS (UMR 6265), Université de Bourgogne, France

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 572341
  • - Editorial

The Development of Oral Feeding Skills in Infants

Chantal Lau | Donna Geddes | ... | Benoist Schaal
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 129328
  • - Review Article

The Experience of Being Born: A Natural Context for Learning to Suckle

Jeffrey R. Alberts | April E. Ronca
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 730673
  • - Review Article

Evolution and Development of Dual Ingestion Systems in Mammals: Notes on a New Thesis and Its Clinical Implications

Jeffrey R. Alberts | Rita H. Pickler
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 581538
  • - Clinical Study

Frequency Modulation and Spatiotemporal Stability of the sCPG in Preterm Infants with RDS

Steven M. Barlow | Mimi Burch | ... | Emily Zimmerman
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 657379
  • - Clinical Study

Intrauterine Growth Restriction and the Fetal Programming of the Hedonic Response to Sweet Taste in Newborn Infants

Caroline Ayres | Marilyn Agranonik | ... | Patrícia Pelufo Silveira
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 195153
  • - Research Article

Insights into Neonatal Oral Feeding through the Salivary Transcriptome

Jill L. Maron
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 130769
  • - Research Article

Oxygen Saturation and Suck-Swallow-Breathe Coordination of Term Infants during Breastfeeding and Feeding from a Teat Releasing Milk Only with Vacuum

Vanessa S. Sakalidis | Holly L. McClellan | ... | Donna T. Geddes
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 207605
  • - Review Article

It Takes a Mouth to Eat and a Nose to Breathe: Abnormal Oral Respiration Affects Neonates' Oral Competence and Systemic Adaptation

Marie Trabalon | Benoist Schaal
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 675724
  • - Research Article

Infant Feeding Practices and Nut Allergy over Time in Australian School Entrant Children

Jessica Paton | Marjan Kljakovic | ... | Pauline Ding
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 848596
  • - Research Article

Prenatal Mouth Movements: Can We Identify Co-Ordinated Fetal Mouth and LIP Actions Necessary for Feeding?

Nadja Reissland | Claire Mason | ... | Karen Lincoln
International Journal of Pediatrics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate23%
Submission to final decision98 days
Acceptance to publication27 days
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