Table of Contents
International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2009, Article ID 721091, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/721091
Research Article

Molecular Cytogenetic Mapping of Chromosomal Fragments and Immunostaining of Kinetochore Proteins in Beta

Institute of Botany, Dresden University of Technology, Zellescher Weg 20 b, 01217 Dresden, Germany

Received 13 May 2009; Accepted 8 August 2009

Academic Editor: Pushpendra Gupta

Copyright © 2009 Daryna Dechyeva and Thomas Schmidt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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