Table of Contents
International Journal of Plant Genomics
Volume 2009, Article ID 835608, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/835608
Research Article

Agrobacterium-Mediated Gene Transfer to Cereal Crop Plants: Current Protocols for Barley, Wheat, Triticale, and Maize

1Plant Reproductive Biology, Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Corrensstraße 3, 06466 Gatersleben, Germany
2Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute, Radzików, 05-870 Blonie, Poland

Received 8 April 2009; Accepted 17 April 2009

Academic Editor: Hikmet Budak

Copyright © 2009 Goetz Hensel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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