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International Journal of Polymer Science
Volume 2017, Article ID 4308687, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4308687
Research Article

Structural Foams of Biobased Isosorbide-Containing Copolycarbonate

1Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology (Fraunhofer UMSICHT), Oberhausen, Germany
2Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) in Industry and the Skilled Crafts, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Stephan Kabasci; ed.refohnuarf.thcismu@icsabak.nahpets

Received 8 May 2017; Accepted 17 August 2017; Published 20 September 2017

Academic Editor: Vinay Sharma

Copyright © 2017 Stefan Zepnik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Isosorbide-containing copolycarbonate (Bio-PC) is a partly biobased alternative to conventional bisphenol A (BPA) based polycarbonate (PC). Conventional PC is widely used in polymer processing technologies including thermoplastic foaming such as foam injection molding. At present, no detailed data is available concerning the foam injection molding behavior and foam properties of Bio-PC. This contribution provides first results on injection-molded foams based on isosorbide-containing PC. The structural foams were produced by using an endothermic chemical blowing agent (CBA) masterbatch and the low pressure foam injection molding method. The influence of weight reduction and blowing agent concentration on general foam properties such as density, morphology, and mechanical properties was studied. The test specimens consist of a foam core in the center and compact symmetrical shell layers on the sides. The thickness of the foam core increases with increasing weight reduction irrespective of the CBA concentration. The specific (mechanical) bending properties are significantly improved and the specific tensile properties can almost be maintained while reducing the density of the injection-molded parts.