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International Journal of Reproductive Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2929013, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2929013
Research Article

Male Involvement in Maternal Health Care at Anomabo, Central Region, Ghana

1Department of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
2College of Distance Education, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
3Department of Community Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Joshua Panyin Craymah; moc.liamg@hamyarcj

Received 21 June 2017; Revised 3 October 2017; Accepted 31 October 2017; Published 21 November 2017

Academic Editor: Hind A. Beydoun

Copyright © 2017 Joshua Panyin Craymah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Globally, male involvement in maternal health care services remains a challenge to effective maternal health care accessibility and utilization. Objective. This study assessed male involvement in maternal health care services and associated factors in Anomabo in the Central Region of Ghana. Methods. Random sampling procedures were employed in selecting 100 adult male respondents whose partners were pregnant or had given birth within twelve months preceding the study. Pearson Chi-Square and Fisher’s exact tests were conducted to assess the association of sociodemographic and enabling/disenabling factors with male involvement in maternal health care services. Results. Some 35%, 44%, and 20% of men accompanied their partners to antenatal care, delivery, and postnatal care services, respectively. Male involvement in antenatal care and delivery was influenced by sociodemographic (partner’s education, type of marriage, living arrangements, and number of children) and enabling/disenabling (distance to health facility, attitude of health workers, prohibitive cultural norms, unfavourable health policies, and gender roles) factors. Conclusion. The low male involvement in maternal health care services warrants interventions to improve the situation. Public health interventions should focus on designing messages to diffuse existing sociocultural perceptions and health care provider attitudes which influence male involvement in maternal health care services.