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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 107969, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/107969
Review Article

Physiopathology of Spine Metastasis

1Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Catholic University, L.go F. Vito, 1-00168 Rome, Italy
2Department of Orthopaedics, Messina University, Via Consolare Valeria, 1-98122 Messina, Italy

Received 7 February 2011; Accepted 1 June 2011

Academic Editor: Alessandro Gasbarrini

Copyright © 2011 Giulio Maccauro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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