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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 464829, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/464829
Research Article

Concomitant Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for High-Risk Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2Department of Medical Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA

Received 14 May 2011; Accepted 27 June 2011

Academic Editor: Michael Veness

Copyright © 2011 Smith Apisarnthanarax et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. To report on the use and feasibility of a multimodality approach using concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with high-risk nonmelanoma skin carcinoma (NMSC) of the head and neck. Methods. Records of patients with NMSC of the head and neck who received concomitant CRT at the University of North Carolina between 2001 and 2007 were reviewed. Results. Fifteen identified patients had at least one of the following high-risk factors: T4 disease (93%), unresectability (60%), regional nodal involvement (40%), and/or recurrence (47%). Ten patients were treated in the definitive setting and five in the postoperative setting. Platinum based chemotherapy was given in 14 (93%) patients. Ten of fifteen (67%) patients completed all planned chemotherapy treatments, and thirteen patients (87%) completed at least 80% of planned chemotherapy. Mild radiation dermatitis occurred in all patients and reached grade 3 in 13% of patients. No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. With a median followup of 31 months in surviving patients, the 2-year actuarial locoregional control and relapse-free survival were 79% and 49%, respectively. Conclusions. Definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced or regionally metastasized NMSC of the head and neck appears feasible with acceptable toxicities and favorable locoregional control.