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International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications
Volume 2014, Article ID 580786, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/580786
Research Article

Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

1Massachusetts General Hospital Depression Clinical and Research Program, One Bowdoin Square 6th floor, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Connected Health, 25 New Chardon Street, Suite 300, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 3 October 2013; Revised 25 December 2013; Accepted 23 February 2014; Published 30 March 2014

Academic Editor: Trevor Russell

Copyright © 2014 Aya Williams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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