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International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications
Volume 2016, Article ID 3929741, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3929741
Research Article

The Self-Perception and Usage of Medical Apps amongst Medical Students in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Survey

1Department of Medicine, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
2Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
3Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA, USA
4Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Received 15 January 2016; Revised 18 July 2016; Accepted 7 August 2016

Academic Editor: Andrés Martínez Fernández

Copyright © 2016 Cara Quant et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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