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International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 406236, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/406236
Review Article

Restenosis and Therapy

1Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest 1089, Hungary
2Department of Vascular Surgery, Semmelweis University, Budapest 1122, Hungary
3Department of Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Szent Istvan University, Budapest 1078, Hungary

Received 28 September 2011; Revised 11 November 2011; Accepted 5 December 2011

Academic Editor: Christopher G. Kevil

Copyright © 2012 Laszlo Denes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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