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International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 876527, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/876527
Research Article

Vascular Response to Graded Angiotensin II Infusion in Offspring Subjected to High-Salt Drinking Water during Pregnancy: The Effect of Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Urine Output, Endothelial Permeability, and Gender

1Water & Electrolytes Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
2Department of Physiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81745, Iran
3Isfahan MN Institute of Basic & Applied Sciences Research, Isfahan 81546, Iran

Received 28 December 2013; Revised 10 March 2014; Accepted 13 March 2014; Published 17 April 2014

Academic Editor: Aaron S. Dumont

Copyright © 2014 Zahra Pezeshki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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