Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
International Journal of Vascular Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 1925176, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1925176
Research Article

Polygamy and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Men Undergoing Angiography: An Observational Study

1Section of Adult Cardiology, Cardiovascular Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2Division of Cardiology, Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Springfield, MA, USA
3Cardiovascular Department, Armed Forces Hospital, Southern Region, Khamis Mushayt, Saudi Arabia
4Cardiovascular Department, Zayed Military Hospital, Abu Dhabi, UAE
5Section of Pulmonology, Internal Medicine Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
6Cardiac Center, King Abdullah Medical City in Holy Capital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
7Cardiovascular Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
8Cardiovascular Department, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
9Emergency Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
10Section of Infectious Disease, Internal Medicine Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
11Cardiovascular Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
12College of Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, UAE
13Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Correspondence should be addressed to Amin Daoulah; moc.oohay@haluoadnima

Received 20 August 2016; Accepted 5 January 2017; Published 30 January 2017

Academic Editor: Bhagwan Satiani

Copyright © 2017 Amin Daoulah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. W. Farr, “The influence of marriage on the mortality of the French peoples,” Transactions of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, vol. 504, pp. 1–24, 1858. View at Google Scholar
  2. L. March, “Some researches concerning the factors of mortality,” Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 505–538, 1912. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. Y. Ben-Shlomo, G. D. Smith, M. Shipley, and M. G. Marmot, “Magnitude and causes of mortality differences between married and unmarried men,” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 200–205, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. U.S. Bureau of the Census, “Mortality by marital status, by age race and sex, urban and rural, United States 1940,” Vital Statistics-Special. Reports, vol. 23, no. 2, 1945. View at Google Scholar
  5. M. Venters, D. R. Jacobs Jr., P. Pirie, R. V. Luepker, A. R. Folsom, and R. F. Gillum, “Marital status and cardiovascular risk: the Minnesota heart survey and the Minnesota heart health program,” Preventive Medicine, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 591–605, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. G. J. Molloy, E. Stamatakis, G. Randall, and M. Hamer, “Marital status, gender and cardiovascular mortality: behavioural, psychological distress and metabolic explanations,” Social Science and Medicine, vol. 69, no. 2, pp. 223–228, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. M. Blom, A. Georgiades, K. D. László, H. Alinaghizadeh, I. Janszky, and S. Ahnve, “Work and marital status in relation to depressive symptoms and social support among women with coronary artery disease,” Journal of Women's Health, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 1305–1316, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. B. Lindegard and M. J. S. Langman, “Marital state, alcohol consumption, and liability to myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension in men from Gothenburg,” British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Edition), vol. 291, no. 6508, pp. 1529–1533, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. E. Dupre, L. K. George, G. Liu, and E. D. Peterson, “Association between divorce and risks for acute myocardial infarction,” Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 244–251, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. E. Hughes and L. J. Waite, “Marital biography and health at mid-life,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 344–358, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. E. Barrett, “Marital trajectories and mental health,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 41, no. 4, pp. 451–464, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. Steptoe and M. Kivimäki, “Stress and cardiovascular disease,” Nature Reviews Cardiology, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 360–370, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. K. Orth-Gomér, S. P. Wamala, M. Horsten, K. Schenck-Gustafsson, N. Schneiderman, and M. A. Mittleman, “Marital stress worsens prognosis in women with coronary heart disease: the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study,” The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 284, no. 23, pp. 3008–3014, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Koskenvuo, J. Kaprio, M. Romo, and H. Langinvainio, “Incidence and prognosis of ischaemic heart disease with respect to marital status and social class. A national record linkage study,” Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 192–196, 1981. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. R. Reviere and I. W. Eberstein, “Work, marital status, and heart disease,” Health Care for Women International, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 393–399, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. R. Wu, T. A. Lennie, M. L. Chung et al., “Medication adherence mediates the relationship between marital status and event-free survival in patients with heart failure,” Circulation, vol. 120, p. S516, 2009. View at Google Scholar
  17. G. J. Molloy, M. Hamer, G. Randall, and Y. Chida, “Marital status and cardiac rehabilitation attendance: a meta-analysis,” European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 557–561, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. J. T. W. Foo and T. J. Lam, “Serum cortisol response to handling stress and the effect of cortisol implantation on testosterone level in the tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus,” Aquaculture, vol. 115, no. 1-2, pp. 145–158, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. S. Retana-Márquez, H. Bonilla-Jaime, G. Vázquez-Palacios, R. Martínez-García, and J. Velázquez-Moctezuma, “Changes in masculine sexual behavior, corticosterone and testosterone in response to acute and chronic stress in male rats,” Hormones and Behavior, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 327–337, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. A. Almeida, S. O. Petenusci, J. A. Anselmo Franci, A. A. Rosa e Silva, and T. L. Carvalho, “Chronic immobilization-induced stress increases plasma testosterone and delays testicular maturation in pubertal rats,” Andrologia, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 7–11, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  21. P. B. Gray, P. T. Ellison, and B. C. Campbell, “Testosterone and marriage among ariaal men of Northern Kenya,” Current Anthropology, vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 750–755, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. D. A. Sbarra, R. W. Law, L. A. Lee, and A. E. Mason, “Marital dissolution and blood pressure reactivity: evidence for the specificity of emotional intrusion-hyperarousal and task-rated emotional difficulty,” Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 532–540, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. W. Tobe, A. Kiss, S. Sainsbury, M. Jesin, R. Geerts, and B. Baker, “The impact of job strain and marital cohesion on ambulatory blood pressure during 1 year: the double exposure study,” American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 148–153, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M. S. Tryon, R. DeCant, and K. D. Laugero, “Having your cake and eating it too: a habit of comfort food may link chronic social stress exposure and acute stress-induced cortisol hyporesponsiveness,” Physiology and Behavior, vol. 114-115, pp. 32–37, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. C. J. Roberts, I. C. Campbell, and N. Troop, “Increases in weight during chronic stress are partially associated with a switch in food choice towards increased carbohydrate and saturated fat intake,” European Eating Disorders Review, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 77–82, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. M. A. Stults-Kolehmainen and R. Sinha, “The effects of stress on physical activity and exercise,” Sports Medicine, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 81–121, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. T. L. Crain, L. B. Hammer, T. Bodner et al., “Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 155–167, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. E. Muller, G. H. Tofler, and P. H. Stone, “Circadian variation and triggers of onset of acute cardiovascular disease,” Circulation, vol. 79, no. 4, pp. 733–743, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus