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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 127852, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/127852
Research Article

Fecal and Salivary Cortisol Concentrations in Woolly (Lagothrix ssp.) and Spider Monkeys (Ateles spp.)

1Department of Animal Science, Interdepartmental Nutrition Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
2Department of Animal Sciences, Animal Sciences Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Building 531, Zodiac, Marijkeweg 40, 6709 PG Wageningen, The Netherlands
3Department of Poultry Science, Interdepartmental Nutrition Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA

Received 13 August 2008; Accepted 13 November 2008

Academic Editor: Lesley Rogers

Copyright © 2009 Kimberly D. Ange-van Heugten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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