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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 721798, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/721798
Review Article

What Horses and Humans See: A Comparative Review

1School of Agriculture, Food Science & Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland
2Department of Life Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
3School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Southwell, NG25 0QF, UK

Received 25 June 2008; Accepted 26 January 2009

Academic Editor: Lesley Rogers

Copyright © 2009 Jack Murphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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