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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 921371, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/921371
Research Article

Size-Related Differences in the Thermoregulatory Habits of Free-Ranging Komodo Dragons

1Department of Zoology & Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA
2Komodo Survival Program Indonesia, Jalan Pulau Moyo Komplek Karantina, Blok 4 No. 2 Denpasar, Bali 80222, Indonesia
3Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010, Australia
4Conservation and Research for Endangered Species, Zoological Society of San Diego, Escondido, CA 92027, USA

Received 11 January 2010; Accepted 14 June 2010

Academic Editor: Tobias Wang

Copyright © 2010 Henry J. Harlow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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