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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2008, Article ID 626827, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/626827
Review Article

Interactions of the Intestinal Epithelium with the Pathogen and the Indigenous Microbiota: A Three-Way Crosstalk

1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Mucosal Immunology Laboratories, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
2Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 2 July 2008; Accepted 8 August 2008

Academic Editor: Vincent B. Young

Copyright © 2008 C. V. Srikanth and Beth A. McCormick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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