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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 190354, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/190354
Review Article

Oxidative Stress in Chagas Disease

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
2Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
43.142C Medical Research Building, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-1070, USA

Received 19 March 2009; Accepted 23 April 2009

Academic Editor: Herbert B. Tanowitz

Copyright © 2009 Shivali Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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