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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2009, Article ID 926521, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/926521
Review Article

Molecular Diagnostic Tests for Microsporidia

1Department of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
2Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark, NY 07102, USA
3Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA

Received 31 March 2009; Accepted 12 May 2009

Academic Editor: Herbert B. Tanowitz

Copyright © 2009 Kaya Ghosh and Louis M. Weiss. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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