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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 380456, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/380456
Review Article

Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA

Received 15 August 2009; Revised 14 November 2009; Accepted 9 March 2010

Academic Editor: Marylou V. Solbrig

Copyright © 2010 Marco Bortolato and Sean C. Godar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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