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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2010, Article ID 747892, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/747892
Review Article

Neuroinvasion in Prion Diseases: The Roles of Ascending Neural Infection and Blood Dissemination

Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA-Lasswade), Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK

Received 30 October 2009; Accepted 8 March 2010

Academic Editor: Marylou V. Solbrig

Copyright © 2010 Sílvia Sisó et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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