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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2013, Article ID 102934, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/102934
Review Article

Immunological Aspects of Candida and Aspergillus Systemic Fungal Infections

1Medical Writer, Goldammerweg 4, 91301 Forchheim, Germany
2University Hospital of Munich-Großhadern, 81377 Munich, Germany
3Department of Hematology, Hemostaseology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Hannover, 30625 Hannover, Germany
4Medical Clinic II, University of Würzburg, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
5Department of Hematology, Charité, Campus Benjamin Franklin, 12203 Berlin, Germany

Received 26 April 2012; Accepted 2 January 2013

Academic Editor: Massimiliano Lanzafame

Copyright © 2013 Christoph Mueller-Loebnitz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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