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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2014, Article ID 284317, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/284317
Research Article

The Prevalence of HIV by Ethnic Group Is Correlated with HSV-2 and Syphilis Prevalence in Kenya, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States

1Sexually Transmitted Infections, HIV/STI Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
2Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7700, South Africa
3HIV/STI Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium

Received 1 July 2014; Accepted 10 September 2014; Published 24 September 2014

Academic Editor: Geoffrey Gottlieb

Copyright © 2014 Chris Richard Kenyon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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