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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2017, Article ID 4894598, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4894598
Review Article

Sulfated Glycans and Related Digestive Enzymes in the Zika Virus Infectivity: Potential Mechanisms of Virus-Host Interaction and Perspectives in Drug Discovery

1Program of Glycobiology, Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, 21941-913 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Vitor H. Pomin; rb.jrfu.demqoib@hvnimop

Received 24 October 2016; Accepted 4 January 2017; Published 19 January 2017

Academic Editor: Sandro Cinti

Copyright © 2017 Vitor H. Pomin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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