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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2017, Article ID 6491606, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6491606
Review Article

Early Human Migrations (ca. 13,000 Years Ago) or Postcontact Europeans for the Earliest Spread of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis to the Americas

Department of Liberal Studies, Texas A&M University at Galveston, P.O. Box 1675, Galveston, TX 77553-1675, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Samuel Mark; ude.gumat@skram

Received 19 June 2017; Revised 2 October 2017; Accepted 17 October 2017; Published 9 November 2017

Academic Editor: Adalberto R. Santos

Copyright © 2017 Samuel Mark. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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