Table of Contents
ISRN Zoology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 436049, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/436049
Research Article

A Reevaluation of the Status of the Foxsnakes Pantherophis gloydi Conant and P. vulpinus Baird and Girard (Lepidosauria)

1Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402, USA
2Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614, USA
3School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4004, USA

Received 8 February 2011; Accepted 1 April 2011

Academic Editors: A. Ramirez-Bautista and B. A. Young

Copyright © 2011 Brian I. Crother et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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