Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 789232, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/789232
Review Article

Pathogenic Mechanisms and In Vitro Diagnosis of AERD

1Allergie- und Intoleranzlabor, Medizinisch Klinik III, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glückstraße 4a, 91054 Erlangen, Germany
2Klinik für HNO-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Krankenhaus Holweide, Neufelder Straße 32, 51067 Köln, Germany

Received 13 January 2012; Accepted 27 February 2012

Academic Editor: A. P. Sampson

Copyright © 2012 Dirk Schäfer and Steffen Maune. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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