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Journal of Addiction
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 160486, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/160486
Research Article

Everyday Prospective Memory and Executive Function Deficits Associated with Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke

Collaboration for Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR), Division of Psychology, Department of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK

Received 24 April 2012; Revised 22 August 2012; Accepted 22 August 2012

Academic Editor: Jennifer B. Unger

Copyright © 2013 Thomas M. Heffernan and Terence S. O'Neill. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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