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Journal of Applied Mathematics
Volume 2016, Article ID 5238737, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5238737
Research Article

Numerical Simulation of Bubble Coalescence and Break-Up in Multinozzle Jet Ejector

1Centre for Industrial Mathematics and Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat 390001, India
2Centre of Computational Engineering and Integrated Design (CEID), Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, 53851 Lappeenranta, Finland
3Department of Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, 53851 Lappeenranta, Finland
4Department of Mathematics and Physics, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, 53851 Lappeenranta, Finland
5Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat 390001, India

Received 26 October 2015; Accepted 22 December 2015

Academic Editor: Guan H. Yeoh

Copyright © 2016 Dhanesh Patel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Designing the jet ejector optimally is a challenging task and has a great impact on industrial applications. Three different sets of nozzles (namely, 1, 3, and 5) inside the jet ejector are compared in this study by using numerical simulations. More precisely, dynamics of bubble coalescence and breakup in the multinozzle jet ejectors are studied by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The population balance approach is used for the gas phase such that different bubble size groups are included in CFD and the number densities of each of them are predicted in CFD simulations. Here, commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent 14.0 is used. The realizable - turbulence model is used in CFD code in three-dimensional computational domains. It is clear that Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models have their limitations, but on the other hand, turbulence modeling is not the key issue in this study and we can assume that the RANS models can predict turbulence of the carrying phase accurately enough. In order to validate our numerical predictions, results of one, three, and five nozzles are compared to laboratory experiments data for Cl2-NaOH system. Predicted gas volume fractions, bubble size distributions, and resulting number densities of the different bubble size groups as well as the interfacial area concentrations are in good agreement with experimental results.