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Journal of Automatic Chemistry
Volume 16, Issue 5, Pages 219-230
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/S1463924694000271

Automated synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography: an apparatus for labelling with [11C] methyl iodide (MIASA)

1Institute for Biofunctional Research, c/o National Cardiovascular Center, Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565, Japan
2Molecular Chemistry Laboratory, Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd, Todogawa-ku, Osaka 532, Japan
3Molecular Chemistry Laboratory, Takeda Chemical Industries Ltd, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532, Japan
4Medical Chemistry Discovery Research, Yoshitomi Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, 955 Koiwai, Yoshitomi-cho Chikuhjo-gun, Fukuoka 871, Japan
5Ogiwaradai-nishi 3-chome 184, Hyogo, Kawanishi 666, Japan

Copyright © 1994 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A fully automated apparatus for the routine synthesis and formulation of short-lived 11C (t1/2=20 min) labelled radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET) has been developed. [11C]Carbon dioxide is converted to [11C]methyl iodide, which can be used to label a wide variety of substrates by methylation at C, N, O, or S electron rich centres. The apparatus, MIASA (methyl iodide automated synthesis apparatus), was designed to operate as part of an automated labelling system in a shielded ‘hot’ laboratory. The apparatus was designed without the size constraints of typical instrumentation used in hot cells, although it is compact where necessary. Ample use of indicators and sensors, together with compact design of the reaction flasks for small dead space and efficient evaporation, led to good reliability and performance. The design of the hardware and software is described in this paper, together with a preparation of 3-N-[11C]methylspiperone as a sterile injectable solution in physiological saline.