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Journal of Automated Methods and Management in Chemistry
Volume 2006, Article ID 26908, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JAMMC/2006/26908

Sampling of Atmospheric Precipitation and Deposits for Analysis of Atmospheric Pollution

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdańsk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza Street, Gdańsk 80-952, Poland

Received 15 August 2005; Accepted 31 October 2005

Copyright © 2006 K. Skarżyńska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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