Journal of Aging Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision119 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore3.200
Impact Factor-

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Journal of Aging Research has recently been accepted into Emerging Sources Citation Index.

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 Journal profile

Journal of Aging Research is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles and clinical studies on all aspects of gerontology and geriatric medicine.

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Journal of Aging Research maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Association of Vitamin D with the TaqI Polymorphism of the VDR Gene in Older Women Attending the Basic Health Unit of the Federal District, DF (Brazil)

Aging is accompanied by various functional modifications determined by their environment, lifestyle, nutrition, and genetics. Based on these factors, it is essential to verify the vitamin deficiency in the elderly population. Hypovitaminosis D is commonly present in human aging, increasing the chances of developing noncommunicable chronic diseases. The VDR gene TaqI polymorphism may modify the vitamin D metabolic pathway by altering the interaction between the vitamin D receptor and the active circulating vitamin D. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between serum vitamin D and biochemical and genetic factors, considering the TaqI polymorphism of the VDR gene, in an elderly population of the Federal District. The study was a descriptive, case-control, quantitative, and cross-sectional type and was conducted in two basic health units in the administrative region of Ceilândia, Federal District, DF, Brazil, with women aged 60 years or older. Anthropometric, biochemical, and genetic parameters (VDR TaqI polymorphism) were evaluated. The adopted significance level was 5%, and statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS version 20.0 program. The study consisted of 128 participants. The most prevalent age was from 60 to 65 years (N = 53; 41.4%). 66 elderly (51.6%) were part of the case group (hypovitaminosis D), while 62 were in the control group. In the case group, 30.2% had grade I obesity, 77.3% were hypertensive, and 51.5% were diabetic. The TT genotype was present in 47% of the case group and 54.8% in the control group (). There was no association between serum vitamin D levels and the VDR gene variant TaqI polymorphism in an elderly Brazilian population.

Research Article

Multicomponent Exercise Training Improves Gait Ability of Older Women Rather than Strength Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of multicomponent and strength training programs on dynamic balance, functional capacity, and gait ability in older women. Methods. Thirty individuals (67 ± 4.3 years; 30.6 ± 3.9 kg/m2) were trained for 12 weeks (3 times per week), following multicomponent (MG: exercises focusing on agility, balance, muscle strength, and aerobic) and strength programs (SG: lower limbs strength exercise). Results. Peak torque of hip flexors () and extensors () and knee flexors () of SG was greater than that of MG at posttraining. In addition, both groups increased peak torque of knee extensors () and plantar extensors with higher effect size for SG (d = −0.41 and −0.48), whereas MG presented higher effect size for plantar flexors muscles (d = −0.55). Only the SG improved the rate of torque development of knee extensors (29%; ), and this variable was also greater to SG than MG at posttraining (106%). The SG and MG improved dynamic balance although SG presented higher effect size (d = 0.61). Both groups improved the performance on 30 s sit to stand test () with higher effect size for MG (d = −0.54). Only the MG improved the stride length (4%; ) and gait speed (10%; ). In addition, the groups improved toe clearance () and heel contact () with higher effect sizes for MG (d = −0.066 and 1.07). Conclusion. Strength training should be considered to increase muscle function and dynamic balance in older women, whereas multicomponent training should be considered to increase functional capacity and gait ability in this population.

Research Article

Effects of the Intervention “Reflective STRENGTH-Giving Dialogues” for Older Adults Living with Long-Term Pain: A Pilot Study

Background. Long-term musculoskeletal pain is a major, often undertreated, disabling health problem among an increasing number of older adults. Reflective STRENGTH-giving dialogues (STRENGTH) may be a tool to support older adults living with long-term pain. The main aim of this pilot study was to investigate the immediate and longitudinal effect of the intervention STRENGTH on levels of pain, wellbeing, occurrence of depression symptoms, and sense of coherence (SOC) among community-dwelling older adults suffering from musculoskeletal pain compared to a control group. Methods. The study was semiexperimental with an intervention group and a control group. The effect of a single STRENGTH intervention was reported on the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) regarding pain and wellbeing. To evaluate the longitudinal effect of STRENGTH, using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), the Geriatric Depression Scale-20 (GDS-20), SOC-13 at baseline (T1), and six months after the intervention/no intervention (T2), a total of 30 older adults, aged 72 to 97 years (Mdn 86 years), were included consecutively and fulfilled the intervention series (n = 18) or untreated controls (n = 12). Results. The intervention with STRENGTH decreases pain (NRS 6 Mdn versus NRS 4 Mdn, ) and increases wellbeing (NRS 7 Mdn versus NRS 8 Mdn, ). After a six-month study period with STRENGTH, no longitudinal effect difference was found compared to baseline. Compared to the control group, there was an increasing trend between decreased pain level and increased SOC level for STRENGTH intervention. Conclusions. This pilot study supports STRENGTH’s effect as a pain-alleviating model that provides a decrease in pain levels and an increase of wellbeing in older adults with long-term pain. STRENGTH dialogues could be a useful intervention to provide individually holistic care in older adults living with long-term pain.

Research Article

Using Augmented Reality with Older Adults in the Community to Select Design Features for an Age-Friendly Park: A Pilot Study

Sedentary behavior is prevalent in older adults. Older adults often underutilize public parks for exercising because the parks do not support their needs and preferences. Engaging older adults on the redesign of parks may help promote active lifestyles. The objectives of this pilot study were to evaluate (1) the effects of wearing augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) glasses on balance; (2) the effects of different virtual walls separating the walking trail from the roadway on older adults’ gait, and (3) the preferences of the participants regarding wall design and other features. The participants were ten older adults (68 ± 5 years) who lived within two miles from the park. Balance and gait were assessed using a force plate and an instrumented mat. It was feasible to use AR with older adults in the park to evaluate features for redesign. Motion sickness was not an issue when using AR glasses, but balance was affected when wearing VR goggles. The area of postural sway increased approximately 25% when wearing AR glasses, and it increased by close to 70% when wearing VR goggles compared to no glasses. This difference is clinically relevant; however, we did not have enough power to identify the differences as statistically significant because of the small sample size and large variability. Different walls did not significantly affect the participants’ gait either because they did not alter the way they walked or because the holograms were insufficiently realistic to cause changes. The participants preferred a transparent wall rather than tall or short solid walls to separate the park from the roadway.

Research Article

Logistic Regression Model in a Machine Learning Application to Predict Elderly Kidney Transplant Recipients with Worse Renal Function One Year after Kidney Transplant: Elderly KTbot

Background. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a public health problem worldwide. Kidney transplantation (KT) is the best treatment for elderly patients’ longevity and quality of life. Objectives. The primary endpoint was to compare elderly versus younger KT recipients by analyzing the risk covariables involved in worsening renal function, proteinuria, graft loss, and death one year after KT. The secondary endpoint was to create a robot based on logistic regression capable of predicting the likelihood that elderly recipients will develop worse renal function one year after KT. Method. Unicentric retrospective analysis of a cohort was performed with individuals aged ≥60 and <60 years old. We analysed medical records of KT recipients from January to December 2017, with a follow-up time of one year after KT. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for elderly vs younger recipients, controlled for demographic, clinical, laboratory, data pre- and post-KT, and death. Results. 18 elderly and 100 younger KT recipients were included. Pretransplant immune variables were similar between two groups. No significant differences () between groups were observed after KT on laboratory data means and for the prevalences of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, acute rejection, cytomegalovirus, polyomavirus, and urinary infections. One year after KT, the creatinine clearance was higher (P = 0.006) in youngers (70.9 ± 25.2 mL/min/1.73 m2) versus elderlies (53.3 ± 21.1 mL/min/1.73 m2). There was no difference in death outcome comparison. Multivariable analysis among covariables predisposing chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 presented a statistical significance for age ≥60 years (P = 0.01) and reduction in serum haemoglobin (P = 0.03). The model presented goodness-fit in the evaluation of artificial intelligence metrics (precision: 90%; sensitivity: 71%; and F1 score: 0.79). Conclusion. Renal function in elderly KT recipients was lower than in younger KT recipients. However, patients aged ≥60 years maintained enough renal function to remain off dialysis. Moreover, a learning machine application built a robot (Elderly KTbot) to predict in the elderly populations the likelihood of worse renal function one year after KT.

Research Article

Morale in Old Age and Its Association with Sociodemographic, Social, and Health-Related Factors in Different Age Groups

Morale can be viewed as a future-oriented optimism or pessimism regarding challenges associated with aging and is closely related to subjective well-being. Promoting morale in old age could be considered to have important implications for aging well, and increased knowledge about morale in different stages of old age is needed. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with morale in different age groups among old people. Data were derived from a survey conducted in 2016, as a part of the Gerontological Regional Database (GERDA). The sample consisted of 9,047 individuals aged between 65 and 86 years from Ostrobothnia and Southern Ostrobothnia in Finland, and Västerbotten in Sweden. Morale was measured with the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) and regressed upon a number of sociodemographic, social, and health-related factors using linear regression analyses. The results showed that older age was an independent factor explaining lower level of morale. Additionally, the sociodemographic, social, and health-related variables could explain a large proportion of the variance in morale. Perceived loneliness, having gone through a crisis in life, poor self-rated health, and depression were associated with lower morale, and sleeping well with higher morale, in all age groups. Furthermore, the oldest age groups seem to be more exposed to several risk factors of lower morale identified in this study. Multidimensional interventions targeting especially social and mental health and the oldest-old could therefore be recommended.

Journal of Aging Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate19%
Submission to final decision119 days
Acceptance to publication35 days
CiteScore3.200
Impact Factor-
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