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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 257093, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/257093
Review Article

DNA Damage and Base Excision Repair in Mitochondria and Their Role in Aging

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n. 28040 Madrid, Spain

Received 19 October 2010; Accepted 14 December 2010

Academic Editor: Alberto Sanz

Copyright © 2011 Ricardo Gredilla. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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