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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 673185, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/673185
Research Article

Identification of Potential Calorie Restriction-Mimicking Yeast Mutants with Increased Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain and Nitric Oxide Levels

1Department of Microbiology, College of Biological Sciences, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2The Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA

Received 16 October 2010; Accepted 31 January 2011

Academic Editor: Alberto Sanz

Copyright © 2011 Bin Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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