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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 136073, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/136073
Research Article

Interactions between Identity and Emotional Expression in Face Processing across the Lifespan: Evidence from Redundancy Gains

1School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
2Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3UD, UK

Received 21 October 2013; Accepted 20 January 2014; Published 15 April 2014

Academic Editor: Arshad Jahangir

Copyright © 2014 Alla Yankouskaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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