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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 184693, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/184693
Research Article

Accelerometer Derived Activity Counts and Oxygen Consumption between Young and Older Individuals

1Department of Applied Arts and Sciences, University of Montana-Missoula College, Missoula, MT 95812, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447, USA

Received 18 February 2014; Revised 1 May 2014; Accepted 2 May 2014; Published 26 May 2014

Academic Editor: F. R. Ferraro

Copyright © 2014 Lucas Whitcher and Charilaos Papadopoulos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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