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Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 584315, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/584315
Research Article

Factors Affecting Mortality in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for Nonmalignant Reasons

1Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize 53100, Turkey
2Department of Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize 53100, Turkey
3Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize 53100, Turkey
4Department of Emergency, Faculty of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize 53100, Turkey
5Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize 53100, Turkey

Received 16 April 2014; Revised 14 July 2014; Accepted 15 July 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: Johannes Grillari

Copyright © 2014 Teslime Ayaz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Elderly population is hospitalized more frequently than young people, and they suffer from more severe diseases that are difficult to diagnose and treat. The present study aimed to investigate the factors affecting mortality in elderly patients hospitalized for nonmalignant reasons. Demographic data, reason for hospitalization, comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, and results of routine blood testing at the time of first hospitalization were obtained from the hospital records of the patients, who were over 65 years of age and hospitalized primarily for nonmalignant reasons. The mean age of 1012 patients included in the study was 77.8 ± 7.6. The most common reason for hospitalization was diabetes mellitus (18.3%). Of the patients, 90.3% had at least a single comorbidity. Whilst 927 (91.6%) of the hospitalized patients were discharged, 85 (8.4%) died. Comparison of the characteristics of the discharged and dead groups revealed that the dead group was older and had higher rates of poor general status and comorbidity. Differences were observed between the discharged and dead groups in most of the laboratory parameters. Hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypopotassemia, hypernatremia, hyperuricemia, and high TSH level were the predictors of mortality. In order to meet the health necessities of the elderly population, it is necessary to well define the patient profiles and to identify the risk factors.